Dating divided postcards


21-Nov-2017 15:50

As people caught on to the usefulness of this cheap and fast method of sending messages, the poor man’s telegram - remember the telephone did not yet exist - national postal services authorised the sending of postcards through their postal systems.It must be remembered that many years, even decades may pass between the taking of a photograph, when it was published on a postcard, and when the postcard was posted.m & french pop/rock Le Tour de France: cycling tactics introduction a general history of postcards other means of dating postcards postcards in the united kingdom postcards in the united states of america postcards in france postage stamp values to aid dating postcards glossary of words and terms end notes You find a pretty and interesting postcard in a secondhand bookshop, maybe in France, or on e-bay.But the correspondent did not date their message and the postmark franking on the stamp is smudged. To help make some sense of being able to date old postcards, first we give a short general history of postcards.1909, 1 December: 5 centimes 1917, 1 January: 10 c 1920, 1 April: 15 c 1924, 25 March: 10 c 1925, 16 July: 15 c 1926, 1 May: 20 c 1926, 9 August: 25 c 1930, 21 April: 15 c 1932, 18 July: 20 c 1937, 12 July: 30 c 1938, 17 January: 40 c 1942, 5 January: 60 c 1945, 1 March: 1 franc 1946, 1 January: 1 franc 50 centimes 1947, 2 January: 2.80 F 1947, 1 March: 2.50 F 1947, 8 July: 3 F 1948, 21 September: 5 F 1949, 6 January: 8 F 1957, 1 July: 12 F 1959, 6 January: 15 F 1960, 1 January: 15 centimes (? One format was a small booklet with a card cover, where the postcards could be removed to post, the cards being perforated down one side to aid removal.

Before this, there were advertising cards that were often hand-delivered.The inland postage rate for postcards was ½d (halfpenny) throughout this period.½d 1st January 1902 - 25th November 1904 Blue-Green 1/2d Yellow Green issued 26th November 1904 Edward VII died on 6th May 1910 The George V 'Downey Head' stamps were issued on 22nd June 1911 (Coronation Day).1917, 1 January: 15 centimes Post card with less than 5 words: 10 c 1920, 1 April: 20 c 1926, 1 May: 30 c 1926, 9 August: 40 c 1937, 12 July: 55 c 1938, 17 November: 70 c 1939, 1 December: 80 c 1942, 5 January: 1 franc 20 centimes / 1.20 F 1945, 1 March: 1.50 F 1946, 1 January: 2.50 F , 3 January: 3.80 F 1947, 1 March: 3.50 F 1947, 8 July: 5 F 1948, 21 September: 8 F 1951, 8 December: 12 F 1957, 1 July: 15 F 1959, 6 January: 20 F • The franc was devalued 100-fold so 1 new franc = 100 old francs.

1960, 1 January: 20 centimes (the 1 January 1959 tariff expressed in new francs) 1965, 18 January: 25 c 1969, 13 January: 30 c • From 1971, 4 January: there are two tariffs - urgent and non-urgent.

Dates can be approximated by the material and design of a postcard.